Glasgow Employment Law Blog

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According to recent research published by the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, low paid workers face restricted chances for promotion, and these problems are compounded for low paid workers who come from ethnic minority backgrounds.

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Research from the Federation of Small Businesses (FSB) has found that half (49%) of small businesses with employees on the National Minimum Wage have either increased wages in the last 12 months or are considering raising pay. The data shows less than a quarter (23%) of small firms have any staff on minimum wage, down from 27% in 2012.

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More women in senior roles

Posted by on in Sex Discrimination

The Scottish Government has announced plans for a ‘Women in Public Life’ summit to take place on 5th November. It will consider issues around the appointment of women onto public boards and what might prevent women from applying for positions on public body organisations and come up with a programme of actions to address these.

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Employers and staff in a business which is changing owner will find the process of the transfer easier, fairer and more effective the Government has claimed as it announced a number of reforms.

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The end of a job for life?

Posted by on in Minimum Wage

According to a new report on job turnover from the CIPD, the proportion of workers leaving their employer at any given time fell by over two fifths between 1998 and 2012, presenting businesses with challenges in establishing cultures of innovation, but equally allowing for invaluable long-term retention of employee knowledge and skills.

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The Office for National Statistics (ONS) has announced plans for an additional regular estimate of the number of ‘zero-hours’ employment contracts in the UK workforce.

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More than 90% of employees in the United States and Australia, and 88% of employees in Great Britain report working during non-business hours, according to the results of a survey conducted by Jive Software, Inc.

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On 29th July 2013 settlement agreements came into force in employment law. These agreements used to be called compromise agreements. A settlement agreement is entered into by an employer and employee and brings to an end the employer-employee relationship. Often such agreements are issued by an employer if there is an ongoing dispute between the parties. In return for completing the agreement the employee receives a financial lump sum but importantly gives up any right to take the employer to an Employment Tribunal or court for any matter covered in the agreement.

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The use of social media to recruit new talent is increasing according to new research commissioned by workplace experts, Acas.

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Maternal breadwinning is the highest since records began, with over two million working mums now the main family earner, a rise of 80% in the last 15 years, according to a new report by the think tank IPPR.

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The introduction of employment tribunal fees, which came into effect on 29th July, could lead to an increased ‘pay-off’ culture in the UK, an employment expert has warned.

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From 29 July there will be new rules relating to the legal agreements which bring employment to an end.

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UK organisations could enjoy cost reductions and productivity gains running up to £8.1bn, or 0.5% of GDP, by optimising their approach to flexible working, according to a report published by the think tank RSA and Vodafone UK.

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The latest figures from Legal & General's Job Security Index shows that confidence in job security among UK workers is at its lowest level since the Index began in January 2012.

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If you are in East Kilbride and need employment law advice on a compromise agreement then we can help. Our employment law solicitors routinely advise employees on the terms of compromise agreements and we are happy to travel to meet with you or alternatively if you wish to email the agreement to us we can advise you immediately on the terms of the agreement and whether you should be being offered more money from your employer.

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Employment Law Changes 2013

Posted by on in Employment Law

Employment law is an area that seems to be subject to constant change and 2013 will prove to be no exception. We will see legislative changes that will lead to increases in statutory maternity, paternity and adoption leave payments from April 2013. Statutory sick pay rates again will increase as of April and the Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Bill will be implemented. Unpaid parental leave will increase to 18 weeks as of March . We will also see the implementation of fees for employees to lodge claims at the employment tribunal, a major change.

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There have been recent proclamations by the Labour Party and the Scottish Executive that they will look to pay workers a "living wage" rather than simply the minimum wage.

What is the living wage? The living wage has no legal force and is entirely voluntary. The Living Wage Foundation has campaigned for the introduction of a wage that will allow workers to live a decent life, meaning that they are able to secure the essentials of life through their earnings.

The latest calculation of the living wage is for an hourly rate of £7.45 for those outside London and £8.55 for those in London ( to reflect the higher cost of living there). The recognition of higher living costs in London is interesting as it does not allow for any other adjustments of the rate  throughout the country, despite the fact that living costs can vary greater within the UK.

Where does this leave the minimum wage? Minimum wage rates are officially binding on employers and are much lower than the living wage rate. Employers cannot pay less than minimum wage ( £6.19 for those over 21, £4.98 for those over 18 and £3.68 for 16 and 17 year olds ) . By implication these rates are at a level where the worker cannot earn enough through that work to meet some of the essentials of daily life, as judged by The Living Wage Foundation.

Uptake by employers has been slow in relation to committing to the living wage but in due course more and more companies will sign up to paying workers at this rate. It may in due course lead to the minimum wage simply being a safety net for employees to ensure that certain employers don`t seek to take advantage of cheap labour and that the vast majority of workers receive a wage that allows a more realistic chance to secure the basics in life.

If you are an employer or employee affected by such issues then please contact our employment lawyers to discuss the implications of the living wage and  the minimum wage.

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Compromise agreements terminate any employer- employee relationship. At Employment Law Glasgow we are seeing an increase in requests for advice on situations where employers need to consider downsizing with possible redundancies but find themselves concerned about making decisions that have employment law implications. Very often this leads to compromise agreements being considered. Why?

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Welcome to the news section of our employment law site Employment Law Glasgow. We will keep you up to date with changes in employment law. These changes occur very regularly in employment law cases and can be of massive significance to your case and that of many others.

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